Aspirationally Paperless?

First published in Tomorrow’s FM February 2013 as part of the Water Cooler regular feature with FM experts: Lee Haury, Liz Kentish, Wendy Mason, Martin Pickard, Lucy Jeynes, Iain Murray and John Bowen. The discussion was inspired by Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt’s desire to see the NHS go paperless by 2018….

The Advent IM response to a paperless NHS.

Data Protections Advent IM

Yay! Paperless was easy!

Paperless as a concept, has been around for a long time. Look around the average office and you will see varying degrees of success in its implementation. For many it is still largely aspirational. Removing  paper records does have some security benefits, presuming they were securely disposed of, of course! By this I mean you are removing one potential source of data loss, but how many of us can commit  to never printing off information or emails for instance? One security eye would always have to be on the possibility of employees doing this and valuable assets being put at risk or marching out of the door. Information is an asset, however it is stored. The NHS (for it is they and Jeremy Hunt who have inspired this discussion) has had a fairly disastrous year with Information Security and received huge monetary penalties. These breaches were not generally the result of hacks or other cyber-criminal activities but the result of poor security awareness and  people doing daft things with both paper records and electronic devices.

Bottom line is, if you are going to use mobile devices and remove the need for paper records, then Security policies have to be watertight and thoroughly trained through all users, they need to know they are accountable. That means if someone decides to load a laptop with thousands of patient records, they should be challenged or potentially prevented, by policy, from doing so. For instance if the device were used merely for securely accessing patient records as and when they were required, it would remove  the need for either paper or local digital storage. Hopefully the NHS are thinking a little further than merely paperless and thinking about how the replacement digital information is going to be stored and accessed. Significant and ubiquitous awareness training is required to make a success of any such initiative and prevent patient data risk.

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