Category Archives: accreditation

Round-up: Top posts of 2015

2015 is almost over and we have been pleased and delighted to welcome many new followers and contributors to the Advent IM Holistic Security blog. It’s hard to wade through all the content but we thought it would be nice to present you with a list of some of our most popular posts this year, by month. (This is based upon what people read and not necessarily when they were published.)

jAN 2015In January, we warned you to watch out for phishing emails if you had nice shiny new devices for Christmas. We were recognised as Cyber Security Solution Suppliers to Her Majesty’s Government and we enjoyed a visit from The Right Honourable Francis Maude to talk all things CyberSec.

 

In FFEB 2015ebruary, we had a visit from James Morrison MP to talk about how cyber attacks affect local and national businesses, we launched Whitepaper on CCTV in schools and discussed the key ‘watch-outs’ in off-shoring data in relation to Data Protection

 

MAR 2015In March, we were exhibiting and speaking at the Security & Policing Event at Farnborough (we will be at the next one too, watch this space for details!) Mike Gillespie’s quote in The Sunday Times, talking about SMEs and Cyber Security back in 2014 suddenly shot back up the blog statistics, as people explored some of our older posts.

 

april 2015In April, law firms were in the sights of the ICO and we blogged about it and people looking for Senior Information Risk Owner Training found their way to the blog. Of course, if you do want to book training you need to go via the website

mAY 2015

In May, Ransomware was on everyone’s radar, including ours.  A lot of readers also sought out an old post on mapping the control changes in ISO 27001 2005 vs. 2013 and we were glad they found our tool to help them with this. We think that more businesses will want to think about this standard in 2016 as security awareness continues to grow and the common sense reveals the huge commercial benefits.

JUN 2015In June, the changes to EU Data Protection regulations had a lot of people talking. Dale Penn gave a no nonsense post, explaining what it meant and it was very well received. We had a Risk Assessment methodology post from Del Brazil, talking, Attack Trees. A post that was also very well read came from Julia McCarron who discussed the risk in continuing to run Windows XP

JUL 2015In July, Social Engineering was a key topic and one of our blog posts was very well visited, The Best Attack Exploit by Dale Penn is still receiving visits. Dale also wrote about hacking Planes, Trains and Automobiles, with clarity, as well as the coverage this kind of hacking was receiving.

AUG 2015In August, we heard about Hacking Team being hacked and it revealed some very risky security behaviour. Dale Penn wrote about this event and other security specialists being targeted. In August, a very old blog post started to get some traffic again as people wanted to read about secure destruction of hard drives and a guest post from Malcolm Charnock got hoisted back into the charts.

SEP 2015In September, TOR was in the press sometimes as a hero, but usually as a villain…well perhaps not a villain but certainly suspicious. We tried to throw some light on what TOR is for the uninitiated and explain why and how it is deployed by a variety of users. It came courtesy of Del Brazil. Another very old post on USBs also got raised from the archive – The Ubiquitous Security Breach.

OCT 2015In October, traffic to the blog doubled and we welcomed many more new readers. All of the posts mentioned here were read but far and away the winner was Crime of Our Generation from Chris Cope, talking about TalkTalk’s disastrous breach.  Marks and Spencers were discussed by Julia McCarron in light of their own security failure. Attack of the Drones discussed a variety of drone-related areas, uses and unintended consequences. A nuclear power plant worker was found researching bomb making on a laptop at work and the EU Safe Harbour agreement melted away. It was a very busy month…

NOV 2015In November, The Bank Of England expressed some firm opinion on cyber security requirements in the Financial sector. Morrisons staff took to the courts to sue over the data breach that exposed their personal information. Australia jailed a former junior bureaucrat who leaked defense material onto the notorious 4Chan website. The previous posts on TalkTalk, M&S, BoE, Safe Harbout and EU DP Regulations were also extensively read in November.

dEC 2015And finally, December…Well the Advent Advent Calendar has been a festive fixture for three years now so we had to make sure it was included and it has, as always,  been well trampled and shared. We also added a new festive bit of fun in the form of the 12 Days of a Phishy Christmas and some Security Predictions from the team for 2016. Why would anyone hack the weather? was a look at how attacks can be intended for other parts of a supply chain. Finally TalkTalk popped up in the news and a conversation again, as it emerged that Police had advised the firm not to discuss their breach.

Christmas card 2015

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Trident vulnerable to hacking?

By Julia McCarron with contribution from Chris Cope.

There have been a number of press stories in the last few days that could have us searching for our 3 pronged spears to protect these shores because, if the news is to be believed, the missile version of Trident could be rendered useless or obsolete from a cyber-hack.

I don’t know about you but I viewed these articles with some skepticism as I can’t believe that the MOD and Government haven’t thought to test the technical vulnerabilities of such a critical system before now, especially one with such far reaching consequences if it were breached?

As I understand it from those who have knowledge of MOD workings, all military systems, including Trident and its associated communications networks, are assured via the Defence Information Assurance Services (DIAS) Accreditors.  This assurance process takes into account the likely threats and resulting risks that apply to those systems, including hacking and other forms of cyber-attack.  There is a stringent policy of assessment and review for all major systems, and Trident will be one of the most assured systems due to its importance.  Clearly, though details of this assurance are highly unlikely to ever be released into the public domain; information on risks and counter measures taken against them will be very closely guarded. And I would hope so too!

The MOD will employ a number of safeguards to protect its most important systems.  Many of these will be familiar to the wider information security field and it’s no surprise that ISO27001 features heavily.  The greater the risks to the system, and the more critical it is, the more stringent the controls in place. Many high level MOD systems are effectively air-gapped and have no connection to the internet, even via a controlled gateway. That means they are effectively isolated from other communications networks, even the authorised users are heavily constrained in what they can and cannot do; use of mobile media for example is highly regulated.  Given Trident’s role as a potential counter-strike weapon, the communications to the deployed vessels receive very careful attention.  Not only will there be good level of assurance against the normal range of attacks, but there will be significant redundancy in place, just in case one fails.  Trident is carried by the Vanguard class submarine, which is designed to operate virtually undetected.  Commanders of these vessels have clear direction from the Prime Minister on what to do if there is evidence of a nuclear attack and all communication from the political leadership in the UK fails.

The comments made by a former Defence Secretary about potential vulnerabilities around the Trident system make interesting reading in light of recent concerns over cyber-attack, but the timing of these comments is telling. The House of Commons is due to vote on the future of the UK’s nuclear deterrent … there I go being skeptical again but as my hero Leroy Jethro Gibbs often says, Rule 39# There’s no such thing as a coincidence…

Banking on Good Cyber Security

Julia McCarron reflects on the news that regulators are almost at the point of requiring major financial services companies to participate in a cyber security testing programme, according to the Bank of England.

It was nice to see the Bank of England talking about cyber security recently, and the importance it sees in testing awareness and resilience amongst the financial sector.

iStock_000015672441MediumIn May 2015, the CBEST scheme for firms and FMIs considered core to the UK financial system, was launched to test the extent to which they are vulnerable to cyber attacks and to improve understanding of how these attacks could undermine UK financial stability.

The scheme is currently voluntary and testing services are delivered by an approved list of providers regulated by CREST, a not for profit organisation that represents the technical information security industry.

The voluntary aspect of this is arguably what could make, what appears on the face of it to be a worthwhile initiative, ultimately unsuccessful. That said vulnerability scanning, assessments and penetration testing should frankly already be part of a financial institutions make up. So, if it’s not, the Bank of England is right be “expressing concern”.

The most interesting element of the Bank of England’s discussions though was that when talking cyber security they acknowledged that it’s not all about technical controls. I quote in respect of them keeping their own house in security order,

“Technical controls put in place had strengthened the Bank’s ability to prevent, detect and respond to attacks. But no technical fix could guarantee security 100%, so at the same time significant effort had been made to improve security awareness among all staff, and incident handling procedures had been strengthened“.

iStock_000013028339MediumThis is something we have evangelised about for years. Technical controls are not the answer. They are only part of the answer. We all know that the majority of security beaches are caused by staff, mostly unintentionally, due to lack of security awareness and training. It’s all very well having a state of the art lock on the front door but if no one knows how to use it what is the point in it being there? You might as well invite the burglar in for a cup of tea and a slice of cake.

The Bank also jumped on the Advent band wagon by mentioning that regulators have been discussing the importance of cyber security being a board room issue for companies particularly in relation to governance. Again, check our archives. We’ve worn down the drum from beating that point so hard and for so long. A security culture will only be successful if it’s supported from the top down. Otherwise it’s a constant uphill walk on the down escalator.

phishOne initiative the Bank took to improve security awareness is one which is growing in popularity, especially amongst large organisations and data centres – ‘Phishing Attack Testing’. This is where a fake phishing email is sent to staff and monitored a) as to how many times its opened, b) as to how many times its reported c) as to how many times the link is clicked and by whom. This helps to raise awareness of the issues of suspicious emails and target staff training. The Bank claims it is personally seeing a decline in staff “taking the bait” and an increase in security incident reporting. A report by Verizon in 2014 stated that as many as 18% of users will visit a link in a phishing email which could compromise their data. This against a backdrop of phishing being not only on the rise but getting more sophisticated in its presentation. So more should follow in the Bank of England’s footsteps when it comes to raising awareness against this type of attack.

iStock_000015534900XSmallSo there are a number of positives we can take away from the Bank of England’s discussions on cyber security:

  1. Technical vulnerability testing is encouraged;
  2. It’s not all about the technical controls; don’t forget to train you staff;
  3. A security culture must start in the boardroom;
  4. Make staff aware of the perils of phishing emails through fake attack testing.

Some places left on our HMG Accreditation Concepts Course in December

As usual, these will be allocated on a first come-first served basis.

Designed to help delegates understand the HMG accreditation process and how to identify, assess and treat risks appropriately following the guidance in IAS Stds 1&2, associated supplement and GPG47. This course is only open to public sector employees. Please contact us for further information on 0121 559 6699.

Advent IM HMG accreditation concepts training

Please book via the website

Full details of how to book available from the training area of the website