Category Archives: consultancy

Data Protection Day 2016!

As it is Data Protection Day, we thought we would take a look at the current state of play when it comes to business impact from data breach and its not pretty reading…

With increasing levels of data being collected every year, now more than ever we need to ensure very high quality processes and practice in our businesses. It is certainly not something to be taken lightly and the changes to EU DP regulations which could result in penalties of  5% of global turnover for serious data breaches, it could actually mean some of the worst offenders face a very uncertain future.

If you are unsure or need some support with Data Protection, don’t leave it to chance; get some proper guidance. Data Protection done well can be a business-enhancing function; raising everyone’s game and awareness of security. It can also mean closer examination of the need to keep all of the data a business currently stores in order to comply with the Data Protection Act.

Here are some of the latest findings on the cost to UK of Data Breach.

data protection day 2016

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We are currently looking for a Business Development Consultant for Cyber Security.

You can find details on our website along with details of how to apply.

http://www.advent-im.co.uk/business_development_consultant.aspx

Business Development Consultant - Cyber Security.

Business Development Consultant – Cyber Security.

Our HMG Accreditation Concepts Course gets IISP Accreditation

HMG Accreditation Concepts Training Course is now an IISP Accredited Course

The popular Advent IM HMG Accreditation Concepts course now comes with its own accreditation from The Institute of Information Security Professionals (IISP)

 Having been run regularly for many years, this well-respected course is designed to help Public Sector delegates understand the HMG accreditation process and how to identify, assess and treat risks appropriately following the guidance in IA Standards 1&2; its associated supplement and GPG47. It is regularly reviewed and updated by the expert team of trainers at Advent IM to make sure it always offers the most up-to-date, complete and relevant training for delegates.

Advent IM Operations Director, Julia McCarron said, “We are very pleased that this important course is now IISP accredited. Recognition of the quality of our course from an important Information Security body such as IISP is confirmation of the value this training offers to Public Sector bodies. Our aim is to position public bodies for very best practice in Information Security. This course is a key part of that aim and the IISP accreditation provides continued recognition of the course as a useful and practical aid to best practice”.

A spokesperson for IISP said, “We are delighted to accredit this training course. The IISP recognises the importance of the HMG accreditation process and the need to fully understand risks and how to manage them.”

Details of the course can be found in the IISP Training catalogue and also on the Advent IM website 

SMEs and Security or How SMEs can impact UK PLC Security (image)

BIS visual v2.0

2013 over the shoulder

Time for a bit of a look back…sort of

The rise and rise of BYOD, the discovery that Ebay is not the appropriate place to divest yourself of NHS Patient data and the increase in malware and not just any malware – mobile malware. These were a few of my (least) favourite things of 2013.

It may seem churlish to poke a stick at the rise of the enormously populist BYOD but its actually connected to the concern around the rise of mobile malware. 2013 saw Blackberry drop off the business cliff and Android devices rise to start to fill the gap. According to the latest stats from Gartner 4 out of every 5 devices in the last quarter were Android powered (driven by growth in China). This proliferation has a knock on effect because this means more employees with be BYODing with Android devices and also more business are choosing them as their business issued device. At the same time, we are reading that Android devices are the top target for malware and malicious apps. I recently heard BYOD described as ‘anarchic chaos’. Let’s see what epithet we can come up with after another year of Android malware…

Looking at Ebay as the place to send your old drives full of (personal) data…hopefully everyone has learned some massive lessons from this incident in Surrey NHS and will be doing due diligence on whoever they procure/source to carry out the destruction of this kind of data in future. Remember, any organisation that has certified to a standard like ISO27001 will welcome an audit so they can prove to you how seriously they take IS processes. This can offer some kind of reassurance and form part of that due diligence.

‘Cyber’ has been a headline grabber all year for many different reasons. Some of the time has been related to the NSA and GCHQ revelations and so Cyber could also have meant privacy. Some of those headlines have related to Cyber Security and the Government commitment to getting UK PLC fully on board with knowledge, understanding and protection. Of course, “hacker” is another word rarely out of the headlines and previously on this blog I have taken issue with media use of both of these words. Largely because it can be misleading, I won’t bang on about it again and you can read the previous blog post if you choose. However, I do think that this continued laziness will encourage people to think that security is an IT issue and therefore, someone else’s problem as opposed to a business issue that needs to be addressed at C-Level.

Phishing and Spear Phishing continue to bleep away on every Security professional’s radar. Whilst scatter gun phishing may not be growing especially, its clear that targeted or spear phishing is increasing. This also relates to my previous point about ‘hacking’ and ‘cyber’ as frequently these can be pre-emptive strikes for a full on attack or part of a broader Social Engineering attack to facilitate or enable a hack or cyber attack. If you want to read more or hear more about that then you can read our posts here and see our presentation here.

The phishing issue is a serious business and employees need proper and regular training on what these attempts look like and how to deal with them. That is not just your standard phishing attempt from someone telling you your bank account is compromised (I had an amusing one recently from Honestly Barclays Security), but a sophisticated phish from soemone who has obtained your email address and is trying to pass themselves off as someone else in order to gain access of information. This requires bespoke training from an employer. Software or a firewall may not protect you from them…

Lastly how our physical world interacts with our cyberworld. 2013 saw Google Glass arrive and the invention of a whole new insult, Glassholes (not mine, don’t shoot the messenger). Some misgivings and some misunderstandings around Google Glass merely serve to remind us that though we are raising a generation that thinks nothing of handing over their privacy in order to get a free app or free wi-fi, there are still enough people concerned about the march of technology ahead of security to make pursuing secure progress worthwhile.

We also saw the mainstream expansion of household items that are web enabled and several furores over TVs that apparently spy on their owners. Add to the list fridges and cars for next year and lets see what else is either causing ‘spying’ headlines or is being hacked by cybercrims. In the business world, smart buildings with IP security and building management systems are becoming increasingly aware of the threat from cyberspace. You can watch our presentation on the topic here. You will need sound. Making sure we buy secure security systems sounds mad, but actually it isn’t happening enough. These systems are sat on networks, needing firewalls and patching and anti virus just like our other systems. We cannot assume because a system is a security system then it is inherently secure.

Remember, everyone in an organisation is part of that organisations’ security. An information asset might be an email or electronic document, but it might also be a fax, a cardboard file,a piece of paper or an overheard conversation about intellectual property. They all have to be protected and a firewall isn’t going to cover it all.

1. Christmas visuals

No doubt we will have some predictions for 2014 soon….

SME Information Risk: 48% suffered reputational damage already from lost data

Originally published in Outsource Magazine August 2012

According to a recent survey by Iron Mountain and PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (PWC), in Europe, mid-sized businesses are placing themselves at unnecessary Information Security risk.  The average index score for Information Risk maturity in this group was only 40.6 (a score out of 100), which sharply highlights the gap between what business is currently doing and what it is supposed to be doing.

Are businesses listening to the warnings about Insider Threat?

Are we listening yet?

Shockingly, 64% of the mid-sized businesses surveyed had no information risk strategy in place, which was effectively monitored.  Given that almost half of the businesses surveyed said they had already suffered reputational damage as a result of lost or misplaced data, this lack of information security appears cavalier at best. It could be your personal data or your organisations data being handled, managed or stored by these businesses.

According the Norwich Union Business Continuity survey (of which information security and reputational damage would be important elements) only 8% of businesses without a plan, which had suffered a serious incident, survived 5+ years, 40% never re-open after a serious incident. If the failings within mid-sized businesses are as widespread as the PWC data suggests this is very bad news for many businesses and could be the one area we start to see them over index, sadly.

Hiding in plain sight

So what does a small or medium sized business do to protect itself, its own valuable data and potentially that of its customers and supply chain? Well, Information Security issues are not like the monster under the bed, despite what the popular press may have us believe.  They don’t frequently leap out to shock you and grab your ankle. More frequently they hang around, waiting to be noticed by someone until it’s just too late and the worst has happened. No amount of finger crossing can spare you from its teeth by then – or the ICO’s teeth in this case. It is normally a series of failings or an extended period of time when risks have been ignored or misunderstood.

Being an SME can make an organisation more ‘fleet of foot’ than many larger businesses. The advantages of being reactive and able to quickly change course or take advantage of a sudden opportunity is a great flexibility to have. Potentially though, the risk side of things can be pushed to one side or ignored and then a lack of due diligence can mean that the new undertaking or direction is being done effectively ‘on the hoof’ and without the anchor of proper governance.  This can also be reflected in the approach to procurement when the questions about the correct checks and balances for security are simply not being asked.  This is possibly because there may not be a dedicated FTE for each role and employees wear several hats. It may be a naiveté about accountability and responsibility either from a legislative or industry requirement basis.  If your organisation is lucky enough to have employed someone with and Information Security or Data Protection background, then this is less of an issue. That is assuming that the resource to have an FTE with these expert skills is available. Generally this is not the case and whilst many businesses are more than familiar with the old outsource service of security, they do not necessarily make the connection to Information and Data.

“Sometimes I feel like the conversation itself is encrypted”

That is how it feels to have a conversation with a security guru. Within minutes the language becomes dense and acronym laden and the eyes of the non-security person may start to glaze or dart about like a frightened rabbit in car headlights.

The concept of Information Security is understandably daunting. Many businesses are put off by the language and apparent complexity. Everyone is put off by things they don’t’ understand but that is what outsourcing is for. Part of the issue is that organisations and those within them responsible for security of information, do not want to feel daft, the language and complex terminology they are coming up against makes them feel inadequate and sounds potentially expensive.

Although security has a long relationship with outsourcing, this has been largely around physical security and areas such as manned guarding. For some reason, outsourcing an organisation’s Information Security, Data Protection or Business Continuity appears to have passed many organisations by as a possibility.

When you think about it though, it makes perfect sense. Areas that are complex and needs and expert help, that may not require and FTE or be too cost sensitive to resource on an FTE basis or maybe required to move an organisation through an accreditation to assist with perhaps getting onto a Government supply framework, or supplying the NHS for instance. Whilst every organisation needs to be security aware and educate their staff effectively, understanding the accountabilities, policies and processes are far more relevant to an SME than having an inside out knowledge of security terminology and the dazzling amount of acronyms. Outsourcing is the natural choice.

One of the 64%?

So the data security inertia may not solely come from a lack of interest or concern about what happens to client, customer or internal information. True some organisations have a genuinely laissez-faire attitude, but many don’t and some of the lack of appropriate action can have come from fear, confusion and misinformation.

Given the ICO’s power to fine up to £500k for serious incidents, this could potentially see a number of the unprepared 64% close for good. It makes much more sense to find an expert outsource partner to translate and guide. Security is a business enabler. Once the security is in hand and under control, an organisation can go on with the business of growing in a secure environment for both the organisation and its partners. It allows organisation to tender for business that they may not normally have been in a position to. It brings likeminded businesses together, allowing them to partner and support each other knowing that they are on the same page and that their respective information assets are properly managed.

Outsourcing Information Security may be a newer area of outsourcing but as with all good outsourcing it is there to provide the expertise it would appear is lacking in the SME arena. Ensuring the best quality, independent advice from an outsource partner could provide the competitive edge and reassurance an SME needs to realise its true potential.

Data sources: PWC Iron Mountain survey “Beyond cyber threats: Europe’s first information risk maturity index” and Norwich Union Business Continuity Survey