Tag Archives: boardroom

The cyber-buck stops in the boardroom…

Advent IM Security Consultant, Del Brazil gives us his view of some of the comments and take-outs that ALL boards need to be aware of, following Dido Harding’s appearance before a parliamentary committee on the TalkTalk Breach.

The TalkTalk security breach continues to roll on with the TalkTalk CEO Dido Harding telling a parliamentary committee on 23.12.15 that she was responsible for security when the telecoms firm was hacked in October. Although there was indeed a dedicated security team in place within TalkTalk it is unrealistic to place the blame solely at the feet of the security team as security is a responsibility of the whole organisation.  It is fair to assume that in the event of an security related issue, as in this case, one person must take overall responsibility and be held to account for the potential lack of technical, procedural measure that may have prevented the breach occurring.

It is a fair assumption to make that in the event that the security breach can be attributed to a single individual then that is an internal disciplinary matter for TalkTalk to resolve unless there is a clear criminal intent associated with the individual concerned.

It is worth noting that although every effort maybe taken to implement the latest security techniques or measures that there is always the possibility that a hacker, like minded criminal organisation or even a disgruntled member of staff may find a way through or around them.

As long as an organisation can demonstrate that they have taken a positive approach to security and considered a number of possible attacks and taken steps to mitigate any potential attack, this may satisfy the ICO that the one of the key principles of the DPA has been considered.

Organisations should always consider reviewing their security measures and practices on a regular basis to ensure that they are best suited to the ever changing threat.  It is appreciated that no one organisation will ever be safe or un-hackable but as long as they conduct annual threat assessments and consider these threats in a clear documented risk assessment they can sleep at night knowing that they have taken all necessary steps to defeat, deter and/or detect any potential attack.

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The TalkTalk security breach has highlighted a number of failings, in the opinion of the author and although they are deemed to be of a serious nature praise should go to the TalkTalk team for being open, honest and up front from the onset.  This has resulted in quite a lot of bad press from which TalkTalk are still feeling the effects from; although some people say that ‘all publicity is good publicity.’  It is clear that TalkTalk are taking the security breach very seriously and are fully engaged with the relevant investigation bodies whilst making every effort to bolster their current security posture.

It is very easy for board members to assume to the role of Director of Security without fully understanding the role or having any degree of training or background knowledge.  Any organisation should ensure that it employs or appoints staff with the correct level of knowledge and experience to specific posts thus facilitating the ‘best person for the best role’ approach.  Currently security, but more specifically IT Security, is seen as a secondary role that can be managed by a senior person from any area within an organisation; however it is finally becoming more apparent to organisations that the IT Security role warrants its own position within the organisational structure of the organisation. Pin Image courtesy of Master isolated images at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

In the author’s opinion it is the organisations that have yet to report security breaches that are more of a concern as no one knows what level of security is in place within these organisations.  It’s not that the author is skeptical that there is an insufficient amount of security in place within these organisations but the fact that they do not report or publicise any cyber security related incidents that is of concern.  No one organisation is that secure that a breach of cyber security or at least a cyber related security incident doesn’t occur.  It’s far better for organisations to highlight or publish any attempted or successful attacks to not only assist other organisations in defeating or detecting attacks but it also shows a degree of transparency to their customers.

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The Insider that rarely gets questioned…

Insider Threat certainly isn’t going away, is it? Reading the continual survey results and news items I see published, it will still be an issue for a long time to come. We know that a lot of the Risk that Insiders bring can be mitigated with good policy and process combined with tech that is fit for purpose. But what of those insiders we don’t really like to  challenge? I speak of the C-Suite; our boards and senior management… surely they couldn’t possibly indulge in risky behaviour?

Risky behaviour is actually quite prevalent in our board rooms, security-wise I mean. (Check out https://uk.pinterest.com/pin/38632509277427972/) Unfortunately, some of the info assets that this level of colleague has access to is quite privileged and so in actual fact, the security around their behaviour actually needs to be tighter but in reality things are not always this watertight and IT security and other security functions will make huge exceptions, based upon the role and seniority instead of looking at the value of the information asset and how it needs to be protected. (Check out https://uk.pinterest.com/pin/38632509276681553/)

Its worth noting that senior execs are frequently the targets of spear phishing and given the level and sensitivity of assets they have access to, this is a huge risk to be taking with organisational security. Ransomware could also be deployed through this method and as a means of coercion. Whilst considering this level of access, we also need to think about the purpose of attack. If this was part of an industrial espionage type of operation, the plan might not be to steal data, it could be to destroy or invalidate it, in situ, in order to affect stock prices, for instance.  It is also worth noting that ex-execs or managers can still be a target and that means they still constitute a potential organisational threat.

Privileged access users like system administrators (sysadmins) also pose a potential threat in the same way as senior business users as there may little or no restrictions on what they can access or edit. A rogue sysadmin or similar could cause absolute chaos in an organisation, but the organisation might not even realise it, if they have also got the ability to cover their tracks. According to the Vormetric 2015 Insider Threat Report, the biggest risk group was privileged users and Executive Management categories were responsible for 83% of the overall risk from Insiders. Yet according to the same piece of research, only 50% have Privileged User Access Management in place and just over half had Data Access monitoring in place.

One more layer to add on top of this would be BYOD. Many businesses have considered whether BYOD is a good choice for them and many have decided to adopt it. Whilst data suggests it may contribute to data breach in adopting organisations, it can be a problem even for those who do not adopt it, as yet again senior execs are allowed latitude regarding the devices they use and may not be subject to the same scrutiny or oversight that general employees are. We know that almost a third of employees have lost up to 3 work mobile devices, we do not know how many have lost their own device also or whether it contained sensitive or valuable business data. We do know that some of these will be senior executives though and this, combined with other risky behaviours (check this out https://uk.pinterest.com/pin/38632509277975844/) will be a major contributor to the risk profile that they represent.